Kae Shummoogum showed off his wind and solar powered home near Calgary with 17 solar panels on the roof and thermal solar panel on the side.

Kae Shummoogum opened his home on Saturday to curious visitors wanting to learn more about why his is the only home in the Calgary area to be powered by wind.

Although, Shummoogum readily says that is just a small part of the entire power his home generates from ecologically friendly sources.

He installed the wind generator at his home, just outside of Calgary’s city limits near Balzac, nearly 20 years ago.

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Source: Livewire Calgary

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Covering 10% of the world’s hydropower reservoirs with ‘floatovoltaics’ would install as much electrical capacity as is currently available for fossil-fuel power plants.

Solar panels need to be deployed over vast areas worldwide to decarbonize electricity. By 2050, the United States might need up to 61,000 square kilometres of solar panels — an area larger than the Netherlands1. Land-scarce nations such as Japan and South Korea might have to devote 5% of their land to solar farms2.

The question of where to put these panels isn’t trivial. There is fierce competition for land that is also needed for food production and biodiversity conservation. One emerging solution is to deploy floating solar panels (‘floatovoltaics’) on reservoirs.

The idea of floatovoltaics holds much promise, and there has been a rapid rise in installation and investments. But there are still many unknowns about the technology’s environmental impacts, along with its social, technical and economic dimensions.

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Source: Nature

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A 100-acre solar project that will bolster the power grid in Southern California and provide two weeks of emergency power for Joint Forces Training Base, Los Alamitos, broke ground May 19.

The 26-megawatt solar project will be constructed, owned and operated by Bright Canyon Energy on a 30-year land lease in a public-private partnership between the energy company, the Department of the Army’s Office of Energy Initiatives, and the California National Guard.

“Energy resilience is something that we as a state have been actively pursuing, just like the Department of the Army,” said U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Michael Leeney, commander of the California Army National Guard’s 40th Infantry Division. “This project only reinforces the commitment that we have to move forward.”

The project is being built with the installation’s emergency response mission in mind and includes a 20 MW / 40 megawatt-hour battery, 3 MW backup generators and a microgrid control system that allows the project to disconnect from the traditional power grid and operate autonomously.

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Source: U.S. Army

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