As the cheapest clean energy technology, solar energy will be deployed at a massive scale to help the world meet its climate & energy goals.

Solar infrastructure brings about important opportunities for ecology and regeneration — this was the headline of the session, “How to reconcile Economy and Ecology?”, co-organized by the Global Solar Council and SolarPower Europe at the Wind and Solar Pavilion, in the Blue zone of COP27 on November 9.

As the cheapest clean energy technology, solar energy will be deployed at a massive scale to help the world meet its climate and energy goals. Such deployment of solar infrastructure requires space and land, creating both challenges and opportunities.

So far, climate change mitigation and adaptation focused on carbon neutrality and sustainable finance-developed carbon markets. But to tackle the challenges of soil degradation and biodiversity loss, finance and business models will have to evolve.

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Source: IMPAKTER

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Disadvantaged communities are bearing the brunt of clean energy supply chain blockages. Many believe that IRA will help alleviate supply chain constraints.

Disadvantaged communities in many parts of the U.S. are bearing the brunt of clean energy supply chain blockages that range from materials to labor, according to environmental justice advocates and utility officials.

In marginalized communities, it is “substituting one kind of delay for another,” said Shelley Robbins, project director for the Clean Energy Group, based in Vermont. “If you can’t get something, the price goes up.”

Historically, renewable energy and electrification projects in underserved communities have been “way too expensive,” she said in a recent phone interview.

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Source: Utility Dive

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Canary Media’s chart of the week translates crucial data about the clean energy transition into a visual format.

Communities around the U.S. are taking the lead to build clean energy projects designed to benefit their own residents, as we’ve been reporting this week in our series Power by the People: Clean Energy from the Grassroots. But some kinds of community-led clean-energy efforts can only succeed if the right policies are in place, and policies vary widely from state to state. So which states are most effectively supporting communities in their quest for clean energy? California and Massachusetts top the list, according to a scorecard from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, while Kentucky and Louisiana are at the bottom.

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Source: Canary Media

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Solar power is becoming essential for healthcare “sustainability and resiliency” as climate change increasingly threatens traditional energy resources.

It is not easy to rattle Rosa Vivian Fernandez. The chief executive of a California healthcare clinic, she sees the harsh realities that the low-income, largely Hispanic community served by the clinic faces every day.

But when Fernandez traveled to Puerto Rico in 2017 to visit family, she was shocked to see how deeply Hurricane Maria had devastated the island.

“All the healthcare centers – the ones that did not get flooded or destroyed by the storm – went down,” Fernandez said. More than 5,000 people died due to the violent Atlantic storm, which caused an estimated $90bn (£80bn) in property damages, wiping out the electrical grid. “People died from the lack of services,” she added.

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Source: The Guardian

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One of the biggest advances we can expect to see over the next decades is how we store and use power from solar cells and other renewables.

You wouldn’t recognise the precursor to the modern solar panel if you saw it, and who knows what they’ll look like in the future?

The precursor to the first solar panel wasn’t really a panel, and it didn’t even use the sun’s light. But the physical processes first observed by French scientist Antoine César Becquerel, in his laboratory in 1839 and then in bars of selenium by Willoughby Smith when checking telegraph cables to be submerged under the Atlantic Ocean, are essentially the same as what happens in solar cells everywhere today.

In a nutshell: light shines onto a semiconductor material, which then produces an electric current – no moving parts, no steam, no turbines.

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Source: COSMOS

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The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 includes a host of measures to support the production of US renewable energy technologies and could foster a new era for made-in-America solar.

In February 2021, US President Joe Biden issued an Executive Order calling for the establishment of resilient American supply chains intended to, in part, advance the fight against climate change. To achieve the current goal of 100% clean electricity by 2035, the US Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that solar energy would need to grow from 4% of electricity supply today to 40%.

This kind of growth will increase the demand for everything along the solar supply chain, from polysilicon through to modules. With both goals in parallel, the desire to foster a domestic supply chain and the necessity to ramp up renewables, the question begs: to what extent can the domestic US solar supply chain be expanded to meet clean energy goals?

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Source: PV Magazine

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Nearly 1TW of under-development solar and wind generation globally could be constructed in the next three years if permitting is accelerated

Nearly 1TW of under-development solar and wind generation globally could be constructed in the next three years if permitting is accelerated through open call procedures and a series of fast-track measures.

That is according to the Global Solar Council (GSC) and the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), which have called for robust investment signals and faster permitting to speed up renewables deployment to tackle the energy and climate crises.

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Source: PV Tech

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Solar panels and parking lots can be a good combination as it provides cheaper, cleaner solar energy, and a more pleasant parking experience.

If you park in one of several commuter lots on Michigan State University’s campus, you’ll likely score a premium parking spot. That’s because each parking lot is sheltered from the sun, snow and rain by solar panels. They’re mounted above the lot on steel structures tall enough for tailgaters in RVs to park beneath. Besides providing a more pleasant parking experience, the university gets cheaper, cleaner solar energy from the solar panels.

It’s a great thing to not have to scrape your car free of snow in 20-degree weather. I know, because I was a commuting student at Michigan State for two years and gladly took advantage of the covered parking.

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Source: CNET

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All businesses that use electricity during the day are desperate for solar energy. The solar has a massive impact on the electricity bill.

A solar power firm has reported record demand from farms as the price of electricity has risen.

MyPower, based in the Cotswolds, has installed 27,000 panels in the past year, up from 7,000 in the previous 12 months.

Its managing director Ben Harrison said he believed energy price increases were behind the dramatic sales growth.

“Farms are facing rising electricity bills, and making your own power can help reduce that impact,” he said.

Adam Henson was their most recent customer.

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Source: BBC

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Hydrogen could be produced for as little as AUD 2.85/kg, supporting Frontier Energy’s plans to make green hydrogen from a 500 MW solar project

Frontier Energy said that results from a pre-feasibility study (PFS) into its proposed Bristol Springs Solar project in Western Australia show that it has the potential to be an early mover, low-cost green hydrogen producer.

The PFS, conducted by Perth-based Xodus Group, is based on the development of a large-scale green hydrogen production facility at Bristol Springs, with power sourced from the company’s planned first stage 114 MWdc solar farm. The solar would power a 36.6 MW alkaline electrolyzer, producing an estimated 4.4 million kilograms of green hydrogen per year.

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Source: PV Magazine

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