Tag Archive for: solar

For 55 days in a row, electricity from solar, wind, and water power exceeded 100% of power demand on CA’s main grid for part of the day.

California has been a leader in the installation of solar power plants and wind power plants for many years now (despite its recent anti-rooftop solar shift via “Net Metering 3.0”). That has led to more and more of its electricity generation coming from renewables. The trend has been going on for years, but there are a couple of recent developments that should really get people’s attention.

Record Solar Power in California Passes 100% of Power Demand

For 55 days in a row, electricity from solar, wind, and water (hydro) power exceeded 100% of power demand on California’s main grid for part of the day. Also, going back further, that has been achieved in 80 out of the last 87 days. That is since early March (International Women’s Day), late winter.

Click here to read the full article
Source: Clean Technica

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

The Shi family is on the leading edge of a solar boom in China, which has long dominated global solar manufacturing.

Shi Mei and her husband earn a decent enough living by growing corn and millet on their small farm in eastern China’s Shandong province. In 2021, they diversified by investing in solar energy — signing a contract to mount some 40 panels on their roof to feed energy to the grid.

Now, the couple get paid for every watt of electricity they generate, harvesting the equivalent of $10,000 per year that Shi can track through an app on her phone.

“When the sun comes out, you make money,” Shi said.

Click here to read the full article
Source: AP News

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

In a major clean energy benchmark, wind, solar, and hydro exceeded 100% of demand on California’s main grid for 69 of the past 75 days.

In a major clean energy benchmark, wind, solar, and hydro exceeded 100% of demand on California’s main grid for 69 of the past 75 days.

May 21 update: Stanford University professor of civil and environmental engineering Mark Z. Jacobson continues to track California’s renewables performance – and it’s still exciting. In an update today on Twitter (X), Jacobson reports that California has now exceeded 100% of energy demand with renewables over a record 45 days straight, and 69 out of 75:

Click here to read the full article
Source: electrek

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

In March alone, solar accounted for 99.7% of capacity added, marking the seventh month in a row in which it provided more new US electrical generating capacity than any other energy source.

In its latest monthly “Energy Infrastructure Update” report (with data through March 31, 2024), FERC says 52 “units” of solar provided 2,833 MW of new domestic generating capacity in March or 99.72% of the total. The balance consisted of 3 MW each of new biomass and oil capacity plus 1 MW each of new hydropower and natural gas capacity.

For the first quarter of this year, solar accounted for 86.79% (or 6,497-MW) of new generating capacity brought online while wind contributed another 12.40% (928-MW). Natural gas trailed with only 49 MW (0.65%) accompanied by 5 MW of oil, 3 MW of biomass, 3 MW of “other,” and 1 MW of hydropower.

Click here to read the full article
Source: Solar Power World

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

State regulators slashed solar programs that school districts rely on to cut energy bills and finance sustainability projects. A new bill could fix that.

California regulators’ hostility to rooftop solar may have hit its political limit, at least when it comes to the impact on public schools.

In the past few months, a host of bills seeking to reverse or amend California’s regulatory push against rooftop solar have faltered in the state Capitol. The exception, so far, is Senate Bill 1374. The bill would amend the November California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) decision that prevents schools, farms, apartment buildings, and other types of customers from using the solar power they generate to offset their power purchases from Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison, and San Diego Gas & Electric, the state’s three major utilities.

Click here to read the full article
Source: Canary Media

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

Portugal generated an ‘historic’ 95 per cent of its electricity from renewables in April, according to the network operator REN.

Portugal has made huge progress in renewable power, up from 27 per cent in 2005 and 54 per cent in 2017.

Portugal generated an ‘historic’ 95 per cent of its electricity from renewables in April, according to the network operator REN.

Renewable energy generation averaged just below that for the first four months of the year, covering 91 per cent of the nation’s power needs.

It’s one national good news story within a great continental shift: fossil fuels provided less than a quarter of the EU’s energy for the first time ever last month.

Click here to read the full article
Source: Euro News

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

Let’s make it easier and cheaper for farmers with dwindling water supplies to convert their lands to solar energy generation.

It sounds like a climate solution everyone should be able to support: Let’s make it easier and cheaper for farmers with dwindling water supplies to convert their lands from crop production to solar energy generation, if that’s what those farmers want.

So what’s stopping such a bill from sailing through the California Legislature?

“Change can be difficult,” said Shannon Eddy, executive director of the Large-scale Solar Assn.

Tell me about it.

Even as coal, oil and gas combustion fuel an ever-deadlier rise in global temperatures, finding a spot to build a solar or wind farm where no one will object is damn near impossible. Some concerns are legitimate, such as safeguarding wildlife habitat and sacred Indigenous sites. Others, not so much. Take, for example, false claims that living near renewable energy projects can cause health problems — claims that have been spread by groups with ties to the fossil fuel industry, and by former President Trump.

Click here to read the full article
Source: Los Angeles Times

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

Giant batteries are delivering solar power after dark in California and helping to stabilize grids in other states.

California draws more electricity from the sun than any other state. It also has a timing problem: Solar power is plentiful during the day but disappears by evening, just as people get home from work and electricity demand spikes. To fill the gap, power companies typically burn more fossil fuels like natural gas.

That’s now changing. Since 2020, California has installed more giant batteries than anywhere in the world apart from China. They can soak up excess solar power during the day and store it for use when it gets dark.

Click here to read the full article
Source: New York Times

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

Scientists in China have developed a PV-driven direct-drive refrigeration system for electronic device cooling.

Researchers at the Hebei University of Technology in China have designed a solar photovoltaic direct-drive refrigeration system with low energy consumption for high heat-flux electronic device cooling.

“The proposed system integrates photovoltaic power generation with direct-cooling and vapor compression refrigeration (VCR),” the research’s lead author, Xiaohui Yu, told pv magazine. “The combination of micro-evaporator and direct cooling method can achieve good heat exchange efficiency.”

The system consists of two subsystems: a PV unit including a battery and an maximum power point tracking (MPPT) controller; and a VCR unit comprising a DC rotary compressor, a fin air-cooled condenser, an electronic expansion valve, an embedded direct cooling evaporator, and a dry-filler.

Click here to read the full article
Source: PV Magazine

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.

Solar is the major driver of this energy transition. EIA said that solar will provide 41% more electricity in 2024 than in 2023.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its Short-Term Energy Outlook report, forecasting that the total electricity generation capacity in the United States will increase 3% in 2024 and 1% in 2025.

“Renewable energy sources—chiefly solar—will supply most of that growth,” said EIA.

Solar, wind, and hydropower in 2023 combined for roughly 21% of electricity generation in the United States. EIA expects this figure to grow to 24% in 2025.

Solar is the major driver of this energy transition. EIA said that solar will provide 41% more electricity in 2024 than in 2023. EIA said the 19 GW of solar capacity added in 2023 and the over 37 GW expected this year account for the large jump in generation. In 2025, total solar generation is expected to grow another 25%.

Click here to read the full article
Source: PV Magazine

If you have any questions or thoughts about the topic, feel free to contact us here or leave a comment below.