Tag Archive for: energy

Utility-scale solar and wind each added more generating capacity than natural gas during the first nine months of 2022

Utility-scale solar and wind each added more generating capacity than natural gas during the first nine months of 2022, according to a SUN DAY Campaign review of FERC data. FERC’s latest three-year forecast suggests that installed natural gas capacity will begin to decline by 2025 while solar and wind continue to rapidly expand.

Solar (6,751 MW) and wind (6,328 MW) each provided more new generating capacity during the first three-quarters of this year than did natural gas (6,086 MW). Combined with capacity additions by geothermal (90 MW), biomass (22 MW) and hydropower (14 MW), renewable energy sources accounted for 13,205 MW or 68.4% of the 19,316 MW of new generation put into service this year.

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Source: Solar Power World

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The off-grid solar sector has shown resilience in the face of pandemic-related challenges, with 70 million people gaining access to electricity from early 2020 to the end of 2021.

Despite the pressure the pandemic has placed on supply chains and income levels, the number of people who source electricity from solar energy kits has continued to grow and has now reached 490 million.

According to the “Off-Grid Solar Market Trends Report 2022: State of The Sector” report – published by the World Bank’s Lighting Global, International Finance Corp. (IFC), GOGLA, Efficiency for Access Coalition, and Open Capital Advisors – the number of people who use solar energy kits had grown by 70 million by the end of 2021, up from 420 million in 2019.

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Source: PV Magazine

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Solar energy usage has increased across northwest Syria as the destruction of power stations has led to constant power cuts.

The outbreak of the Syrian war in 2011 saw the devastation of huge swathes of the country’s infrastructure. Power cuts became rampant in many different regions, which have struggled with the lack of a steady electricity supply – the backbone of modern life – ever since.

In addition to the widespread destruction, the Assad regime deliberately targeted power stations as a form of retaliation against civilians in areas which had escaped his control. This situation sparked the search for alternative options – and solar panels today are the preferred option of many.

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Source: The New Arab

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The latest disaster illuminates how much progress Puerto Ricans have made toward energy resilience and how far the island still has to go.

Just two days before the five-year anniversary of Hurricane Maria, Puerto Ricans received a brutal reminder of how vulnerable the island’s central electricity system remains. On Sunday, Hurricane Fiona slammed into the U.S. territory, bringing feet of rain and catastrophic flooding. All of the nearly 1.5 million utility customers initially lost power.

In a moment that was a bit too on the nose, Pedro Pierluisi, the governor of Puerto Rico, was briefing residents just ahead of Fiona’s landfall when the power suddenly went out in the conference room. Although service has since been restored to some customers and critical facilities like hospitals, it may take several days to fully restore power due to the ​magnitude and extent” of the blackout, said Luma Energy, which operates the island transmission and distribution system.

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Source: Canary Media

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USC-LADWP will provide a quarter of USC’s electricity with power from a solar farm in Mojave and will contribute to new solar programs.

USC will obtain 25% of its electricity from solar-generated power and contribute to new solar programs that expand opportunities for disadvantaged communities to access affordable clean energy — all under a new agreement with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power.

ear agreement approved by the L.A. City Council on Wednesday will help USC meet its goals in reducing carbon-based energy consumption. In addition, the university will become the first L.A. institution to contribute to Los Angeles DWP’s Clean Energy Adder program, which will make renewable energy more accessible and affordable for residents in multifamily dwellings, including those surrounding USC’s campuses.

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Source: USC News

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Spain is betting that greater solar generation will ease its dependence on volatile commodity markets while helping to clean up energy mix

Iberdrola SA turned on Europe’s largest solar plant in western Spain as the country drives up output of renewable energy to cut reliance on fossil fuels.

Spanish power is trading almost three times higher than the five-year seasonal average as Russian gas cuts push up fuel costs. As one of Europe’s sunniest nations, Spain is betting that greater solar generation will ease its dependence on volatile commodity markets while helping to clean up the energy mix.

The plant in the Extremadura region, comprising about 1.5 million solar panels, will produce enough electricity to supply more than 334,000 homes, Iberdrola said in a statement. It’s already connected to the grid and will gradually ramp up production until it’s fully operational within the next four weeks.

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Source: Bloomberg

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The 48-level building features a “solar skin” facade, from which it will generate energy for 20 percent of its base electrical requirements.

A $1 billion development at 435 Bourke Street has been approved by the Victoria’s planning department.

Designed by Bates Smart, the 48-level building will feature a “solar skin” facade, from which it will generate energy for 20 percent of its base electrical requirements.

To be made from vertical glass photovoltaic panels, the solar skin is designed to capture sunlight and convert the energy into electricity. The innovative skin can also let natural light in, providing the same thermal and insulation capacities as architectural glass.

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Source: Architecture AU

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Judge asked for input on how to ease shock and got thousands of pages' worth of advice.

So the tortured, lawyerly tomes on whether and how to revamp electricity rates for California’s solar panel owners are in — hundreds upon hundreds of pages of them in a steamy soup of “NBCs on BTM consumption” and ” ACC Plus adder” and “SGIP storage incentive” and “upfront MTC” — and an administrative law judge is wading through them, weighing the future of your electric bill.

This proceeding before California’s all-powerful utility regulator will impact every person who flips a light switch or presses an “on” button in the Golden State.

If you’re one of the vast majority of Californians who do not have solar panels on your roof, it might save you money.

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Source: Los Angeles Daily News

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The project will support the development of utility-scale solar resources & will boost the reliability of the bulk power system in AZ and CA.

The Ten West Link project is set to run 125 miles between the Delaney substation near Tonopah, Arizona, and the Colorado River substation in Blythe, California. It will be built next to an existing transmission line.

When CAISO evaluated the project, the grid operator found it would reduce costs for California ratepayers by gaining access to less expensive electricity in Arizona, the California Public Utilities Commission said in its November 2021 decision approving the project.

Among the project’s benefits, Delaney Colorado River Transmission expects it will reduce CAISO’s need to curtail renewable energy output on its system, according to the PUC.

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Source: Utility Dive

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The new decision from the CPUC is one of the most significant changes to the interconnection process in decades.

A new decision from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) marks a significant milestone by dramatically simplifying the interconnection process for distributed energy resources (DERs), like solar and batteries, and providing valuable transparency for project developers.

This is one of the most significant changes to the interconnection process in decades and offers a model for other states, at a time when interconnection has increasingly become a bottleneck to renewable energy development around the country.

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Source: Clean Technica

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