Tag Archive for: photovoltaic

New testing conducted at France’s oldest PV system have shown that its solar modules can still provide performance values in line with what the manufacturers promised.

French association Hespul was created in 1991 to set up the first photovoltaic plant connected to the national network in France. Following the inauguration of the Phébus 1 power plant on June 14, 1992 in Ain, Hespul decided to expand its activity to promote photovoltaics in France, which at the time was almost non-existent.

The association has now revealed that around 10 m2 of the panels, corresponding to around 1 kW, were dismantled from the system last year and submitted to a series of tests according to the international standards.

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Source: PV Magazine

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Valencia, a city in Spain is starting to use its cemeteries to generate renewable power. The project has been dubbed RIP (Requiem in Power).

The project has been dubbed RIP, standing for Requiem in Power.

A city in Spain is starting to use its cemeteries to generate renewable power.

Valencia, on the east coast, aims to install thousands of solar panels in graveyards around the city.

The project has been dubbed RIP – standing for Requiem in Power – and was launched this month with the first photovoltaic panels installed.

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Source: Euro News

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PepsiCo has completed a new green energy initiative by installing photovoltaic panels at three sites in Romania.

PepsiCo has completed a new green energy initiative by installing photovoltaic panels at three sites in Romania: Dragomirești, Popești-Leordeni and Covasna.

The project, which represents a USD 2.1 million investment, aligns with its PepsiCo Positive (pep+) decarbonisation strategy and aims for net-zero emissions by 2040.

It involves the installation of over 3,000 photovoltaic panels across three facilities, with a total capacity of 1,700 kWp, expected to generate more than 1,300 MWh of clean energy annually.

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Source: Potato Pro

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The US DOE unveiled a $71 million investment today, with $16 million allocated from the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

In line with President Biden’s Investing in America agenda, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) unveiled a $71 million investment today, with $16 million allocated from the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment aims to bolster research, development, and demonstration projects across the U.S. solar energy supply chain, addressing critical gaps in domestic manufacturing capacity.

Selected projects will focus on enhancing various aspects of the solar supply chain, including equipment, silicon ingots and wafers, and both silicon and thin-film solar cell manufacturing. Additionally, efforts will be made to explore new markets for solar technologies, such as dual-use photovoltaic applications, which encompass building-integrated PV and agrivoltaics.

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Source: Solar Quarter

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The Intertubes lit up today with news of a new, 190% efficient solar cell that could finally send fossil fuels packing once and for all.

The Intertubes lit up today with news of a new, 190% efficient solar cell that could finally send fossil fuels packing once and for all. The research is still in the proof-of-concept stage, but other solar cells that shoot past the 100% mark are already in development, so anything is possible. However, if you’re thinking this blows the Shockley-Queisser theoretical limit to bits, well, guess again.

Solar cells can shoot past 100% efficiency, depending on what that means

The Shockley-Queisser limit refers to the ability of solar cells to convert sunlight to electricity. The theory emerged in the 1960s to describe the upper limit of basic silicon photovoltaic technology. The initial limit was determined to be 30%, later revised upward to 33.7%.

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Source: Clean Technica

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Researchers in Italy have conducted a series of experiments to assess the quality of wheat growing under elevated agrivoltaic systems.

Researchers in Italy have conducted a series of experiments to assess the quality of wheat growing under elevated agrivoltaic systems. The have found that it has greater nutritional value for livestock.

The CNR Institute for Bioeconomy, the University of Florence, and Italian agrivoltaic specialist REM Tec srl conducted the study on 11.4 hectares of wheat in Borgo Virgilio, in the province of Mantua. The system featured 7,680 Bisol panels and 768 trackers at a height of 4.5 meters, for total PV coverage of 1.3 hectares.

The team used three sections of 12 meters x 12 meters with photovoltaic coverage with a ground coverage ratio (GCR) of 13% and three sections of 144 m2 with a GCR of 41%. They also used three as reference sections with similar characteristics, but without panels and shading structures.

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Source: PV Magazine

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The Cantine Vaccaro vineyard lives in perfect harmony with photovoltaic panels, a part of the “Agrivoltaico Open Labs” initiative in Italy.

In Salaparuta, the Cantine Vaccaro vineyard lives in perfect harmony with photovoltaic panels. The installation is part of the “Agrivoltaico Open Labs” initiative, a series of open-air innovation laboratories where we test the integration of solar energy production, agriculture and biodiversity protection.

What does good wine have to do with renewable electricity? The answer is a lot, and this is thanks to the Sun. Indeed, its light and heat play a key role in the life cycle of the vineyard and the ripening of grapes. The Sun’s rays contribute to chlorophyll photosynthesis by making plants grow, while at the same time they are a key resource for generating electricity, thanks to photovoltaic panels that can capture solar energy.

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Source: REVE

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First Solar is spending $450M to establish a research and development center focused on the production of thin film photovoltaic modules.

First Solar is investing $450 million in a new research and development center in an already-existing manufacturing facility. This research will be focused on creation and development of environmentally friendly and high-performing thin film photovoltaic (PV) modules for semiconductors.

“The company’s two existing facilities in Perrysburg and Lake Township comprise the largest vertically-integrated complex of its kind in the Western Hemisphere. They will now expand by 0.9 gigawatts (GWDC).” – WTOL11, October 27, 2022

“Designed and developed at its R&D centers in California and Ohio, First Solar’s advanced thin film PV modules set industry benchmarks for quality, durability, reliability, design, and environmental performance. The modules have the lowest carbon and water footprint of any commercially available PV technology today. Each module features a layer of Cadmium Telluride (CadTel) semiconductor that is only three percent the thickness of a human hair. Additionally, the company continues to optimize the amount of semiconductor material used by enhancing its vapor deposition process through continued investment in R&D focused on more efficient module technology with a thinner semiconductor layer. First Solar also operates an advanced recycling program that provides closed-loop semiconductor recovery for use in new modules.” – First Solar, October 27, 2022

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Source: American Progress

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A French town is installing a canopy of solar panels over its cemetery that will distribute energy to local residents.

A French town is installing a canopy of solar panels over its cemetery that will distribute energy to local residents.

The idea didn’t start with solar. Saint-Joachim is located in the middle of the Brière marsh – a vast peat bog north of the Loire estuary.

When it outgrew its churchyard cemetery in 1970, a new graveyard was created to the east of the town’s main island, a drop from six to zero metres above sea level.

Upsettingly for families with loved ones buried there, that means the cemetery often floods in winter. Draining the ground would be a constant battle with the wetland, so Saint-Joachim’s mayor proposed covering the site to stop it from filling up with rainwater.

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Source: Euro News

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Solar photovoltaic (PV) energy in Europe projected to spike by 50 TWh in 2024, surpassing other generation sources.

Despite a record-breaking 60 gigawatts direct current (GWDC) of solar PV capacity expansion in 2023, solar power generation in Europe saw a modest increase of about 20%. This year, however, will be another story.

Rystad Energy forecasts solar photovoltaic (PV) energy will spike by about 50 terawatt-hours (TWh) in 2024 – growing for the first time more than any other generation source – due to major capacity installations across the region, with Germany leading the way. Wind power generation is also expected to increase in 2024. However, the growth rate will not match the last one seen in 2023, when wind energy output increased by 50 TWh thanks to additional capacity installations and a windier year, particularly in the last quarter.

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Source: OilPrice

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